Background History of the HCFC Transition Process

History of the Problem

The idea that chlorinated solvents, refrigerants and other chemicals might be destroying earth’s protective ozone shield surfaced in the mid ’70’s.  In 1978, when the idea of ozone-depletion became a mainstream theory, the EPA banned CFC propellants in aerosol cans.  In 1985 the ozone hole in the Antarctic was detected.  The evidence began to add up, and the theories evolved into accepted scientific fact.  It became clear that chlorinated solvents were part of the problem.  A series of international meetings culminated in the 1987 Montreal Protocol, which mandated the gradual phase-out of ozone depleting substances, worldwide.


NASA satellites show the size of the region of depleted Antarctic ozone (shown in blue) extended to a record 10.5 million square miles on Sept 19,1998 [photo courtesy NASA].

The idea that chlorinated solvents, refrigerants and other chemicals might be destroying earth’s protective ozone shield surfaced in the mid ’70’s.  In 1978, when the idea of ozone-depletion became a mainstream theory, the EPA banned CFC propellants in aerosol cans.  In 1985 the ozone hole in the Antarctic was detected.  The evidence began to add up, and the theories evolved into accepted scientific fact.  It became clear that chlorinated solvents were part of the problem.  A series of international meetings culminated in the 1987 Montreal Protocol, which mandated the gradual phase-out of ozone depleting substances, worldwide.

Interim Solution

To smooth the transition away from the millions of pounds of CFC’s and 1, 1, 1 trichloroethane used in industrial applications, EPA authorized the continued use of HCFC solvents based on their slightly lower ozone-depletion potential. This “acceptable interim solvent” exemption for HCFC’s ended on January 1, 2003, and users are now forced to develop strategies for implementing effective alternatives. 

Ecolink has spent the last several years formulating, testing and marketing safe, cost-effective alternatives to HCFC-141b. Just as Ecolink helped hundreds of military, aerospace, utility and industrial solvent users switch from 1,1,1 and CFC’s in the 90’s, we are committed to support our customers through this final regulatory transition.

Contact Ecolink for support

If you currently use Ecolink 2005, Select Free or other HCFC-141b products, be sure to order sufficient supply for your transition needs. Call 800-563-1305 today.

Download a white paper on the 141b Transition

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